The Blue Line turns 50!

Can you believe that the London Underground Victoria line is going to be celebrating its fiftieth anniversary this year? That’s right, the celebrated blue line will have been running for five decades since construction was undertaken between the first section from Walthamstow Central to Highbury and Islington. (The later stations to Brixton were gradually added as the station line was extended.) So what are the treasures you can see if you decide to take the line southwards?

One of the treasures you can see at Walthamstow Central is Vestry House Museum. Just a short walk away from the station itself, you can have a look inside the museum itself, which used to be a workhouse. The building, which was built in the eighteenth century, is a rich display of local history. There is a costume gallery and you can have a taste of what Victorian life was like. The best thing of all is that it’s free! This is a wonderful place to take the kids.

For those of us that are older – well, young adults really – Tottenham Hale might be your place to be. If you are into the nightlife, you might want to head up to Styx. Up sticks to Styx as they say! It has a good music scene, and has been described as an edgy music venue. Certainly not boring! You are guaranteed a good night out there. They run different club nights and also has alternative theatre shows. And just what exactly is an alternative theatre show? Not spoiling it, you’ll just have to head down to see it. And while you’re there, get down and munch on their tasty pizzas. The entry price depends on the night, so check it out before you head there.

A few stops down the line from Tottenham Hale is Finsbury Park. Finsbury Park was formerly known as Brownswood Park and is a great place to bring the kids when the sun is out. Thee are many playgrounds for them to enjoy playing at and when they get tired, you can take them to the cafe for a tasty snack. But what if the weather is not so good? There are many things to do around the area too. You can visit the theatre around the station, or Seven Sisters Road contains a wide array of shops guaranteed to tickle your fancy.

You are indeed blessed if you live around the Finsbury Park area – it is one of the established places with good transport links. There are places for artistic and health development. Gyms, theatre classes and music classes abound.. And if you are looking to start music lessons like learning the piano, why not get in touch with pianoWorks? A tutor visits your house and you get to play music suitably adapted, and music you like. Get in touch via the above link and learn a skill for life!

Are you an early riser?

How quickly do you wake up in the morning? Are you the kind of person that springs out of bed before your phone alarm has had the opportunity to vibrate three times? Do you ever need a backup alarm that you never use? (By backup alarm, I mean setting an additional one, say a proper, real, alarm clock that you have in case your phone runs out of charge or something like that?) Do you never give the backup alarm the opportunity to get tested because you are out before the first alarm has run its course?

Some of us are like that and will know people like that. Others may confess to be perpetual snoozers, hitting the snooze button so many times each morning that after a few months there may be a noticeable dent on the snooze button. One of the inventions built to counter this love for snoozing was the running alarm clock, sort of like an alarm on wheels which would just move away and induce you to get out of bed in order to turn it off, although I have to say, if you were the snoozing type, you probably would not have had the self discipline to stick to using this alarm clock.

Your will and drive to get up in the morning may pretty much depend on what you are getting up for. If it is something worthwhile, you will want to be up for it. But if it is seen to be something routine and mundane, then maybe not. Case in point – look at teenagers. On most mornings they will have problems or difficulties getting up for school, because they will complain it is too early. Yet in the holidays, when they have all the time in the world to do what they want, and time is at their disposal, they may get up early and have no difficulty arising to continue playing computer games even if they may have gone to bed late that previous night.

So what does this demonstrate? The importance of finding a career you are passionate about.

The composer Igor Stravinsky had strong ideas about the direction of music which sustained his creative drive over many decades of work. While he started out writing “nice” tunes in the previous existant style, his music style took a new direction with The Rite of Spring, a work which was not quite well-received initially but has since been recognised for its impact of Western music (learn more about this from the Crouch End Piano Teacher website. Surely his drive and thoughts about music, despite the opposition around him, would have kept him going. And you know what? He was notoriously an early riser, getting up before down to compose music!

Using Social to your advantage

Some people will attest to this fact: Your choice of social media reflects the generation you were born in, and hence your age group. Is there any truth in that? Well, perhaps. But this only works on the assumption that you stick with one brand for life. It assumes you are likely to go with the predominant brands of your time, then build up your followers and your profile as you go along, and then before you know it, you will have established connections with like minded individuals as yourself, enjoying the clique of a core group, and leaving the social media platform means abandoning the friends you have amassed and essentially cutting a big part of your life.

Depending on how much you have time you have spent – this could be anything from a few hours to a few months – it could be hard to break away. Even when you are straining to make a new start, you could feel really feel the pull increasing. Or as they say, the more you pull against the strain, the more you strain against the pull.

Social media is captivating and once you are entrenched in it, it is difficult to get out of its seductive pull. Some people use it as an opportunity to promote their work to an audience that has similar interests. After all, you have already connected with people with similar interests to yourself. It is then easy to promote products you might create yourself, such as if you were an author and wanted to promote books to your followers. You might even earn money from affiliate marketing, pushing other people’s products. Or you could be a social media influencer, purporting to use certain products and claiming to have a level of success, inspiring others to jealously follow you to emulate the success in your life. Social media influencing is really advertising by stealth.

Social media might enable someone to have a chance encounter with whatever business product you are offering. And that chance encounter may develop into a lifelong passion. Did you know that the composer Leonard Bernstein would not have gone down the classical music route had it not been a chance encounter with a piano in his younger years? From then on he was hooked. You can read more about this in the Muswell Hill Piano Teacher blog. Someone might encounter you on social media via a follower you already have, and likewise you might meet someone who may enhance your business, or offer you a service that will reduce your costs, so remember to devote your time and manage your social media to your advantage!

What food advertisements may reveal to us

You see lots of things advertised on public transport. Step into a London underground tube carriage and what do you see? Ads for musicals, food, places to go, money – and whatever you think of the advertisments, you can’t disagree that there is a captive audience. Bored people will glance up and take note of the advertisements, and even if you don’t commit to buy, the ads will have made an impression on your mind, that may induce you at a later stage to a purchase by a somewhat circuituous route.

But if you consider that advertisements are placed where they can have the most result, then their target market exists within the boundaries. Simply to say, if a tube carriage contains certain types of advertisements, then the advertisers must believe that their clientele exists there. You wouldn’t advertise a pregnancy test kit in a senior citizens’ magazine.

So what can the advertisements on tube carriages tell us?

Some believe that the ads can tell us various things. One of them is our relationship to food. Where in the past, people used to believe that sitting down to dinner was a daily affair, not it is believed that it is okay to sit up alone and indulge yourself in front of the TV and social media catchup. In other words, the number of takeaway ads suggest that the social side to eating is gone. People no longer sit at a table together to talk. Eating is lesson of a social expereience than belore.

Some suggest that the elimination of a social experience of dining is more further advanced that before. Eating is that annoying thing you have to do to stay alive. It is almost like eating gets in the way of work and going home. Considering the number of hours that people now work, the advertising of a takeaway meal to solven life’s annoying need to have to eat to say alive is symptomatic of that fact we work really long hours nowadays.

So that is what food ads on the tube can tell you. Sitting down at a table is too long, and gets in the way of work. It tells us we are working longer hours overall.

But bear in mind that what you see only tells one side of the story. The following is a case in point. The music composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was always thought to be an extrovert. But it turns out that he was depressed, and prone to bouts of introspection too. (You can read more about Mozart from the Piano Teacher N8 website using this link.

Perhaps tube advertisements about food only tell us one side of the story, and a closer examination of other things around might yield a better picture. Still worth a thought though!

Jack of all trades?

Suppose you had a guy ring you and say one thing like “Let’s meet for dinner tonight. There’s a great place downtown and the food is great and the music they play is really cool,” and when you meet for dinner there everything is as described. At the end of the evening the guy leans over to you and says, “I really had a nice evening” and when he walks you back to you house, he sings your praises and tells you what a lovely person you are and what a great time he had too. And when you probe, “Would you want to go there again?” and he says “I would”, your hopes are high, not because of the place itself, but because it is a way of perhaps saying he is attracted to you and wants to go out again.

Then the next day on Facebook (or some other form of social media, depending on your age – unfortunately my demographic preference is Facebook) you find out that he actually has a string of girlfriends and flings, and has actually a bit of a reputation as a womaniser. Of course, you might have done your research prior to going out with him. But hear me out – let’s suggest he has actually a girlfriend, or someone he is linked to. And when she asks him if he would go out with you again, and she says she actually heard him say “I would” – perhaps an undercover investigator was tailing you – and his response to her is to say, “Actually, I had meant to say ‘I wouldn’t’,” meaning that his message to you was an unfortunate slip of the tongue, then you might think, “This guy is either mentally unstable in some way, or he is a two-timing turncoat who says anything if he thinks he can get away with it.”

The problem with politics is that to appeal to a large voter base you need to be different things to different people. But perhaps here’s where a lesson can be learnt. The classical music composer Muzio Clementi was a composer, performer, piano manufacturer, mentor, publisher – but crucially, never all at the same time. You can read more about this in the Piano Teacher N4 blog.

So when the President of the United States says Russia did not collude to influence the US presidential elections, and then turns around the next day to say he meant to say the contrary, you know what to make of Donald Trump.

How many days until the next vote?

Success spoils: Staying Hungry

As we come to the conclusion of the World Cup, and a final involving a French and Croatian team, it is a good time to ponder over questions such as the following:

How did a team with a big national population and established football league and facilities, lose to a team from a small country and poor facilities? The majority of the Croatian team play outside of their own country and for those that remain, they have to train in ramshackle facilities and in harsher conditions. You can argue that these inbreed greater will to succeed, instead of the footballing teens who haven’t quite made it yet but are on high salaries.

Ever heard of Ainsley Maitland-Niles? Arsenal’s young player has played in a few games this season, but is on thirty-thousand pounds a week. If that is the salary of a fringe player, it is quite a cushy life, compared to what other people in normal jobs take home. A person’s annual salary in one week? You can see why some make the accusation that the hunger is lacking. Grown men in other European leagues have to fight to succeed to get anywhere near that.

The problem when you get too much, too soon, is that you go soft. You start to think about doing as little as possible to coast your salary. If you look at Arsenal’s Mesut Ozil, he has been a peripheral figure for much of the seasons; only when it was contract renewal time did he put in an extra shift. But now that he has signed his new contract, and will be banking every week more than people make in a year, as long as he can ignore the criticism of fans, he will be fine.

The NFL quarterback Ryan Leaf was only fresh out of college when he signed a multi-million pound contract. But he only played a few years – totalling a few games – too much money too soon. Success spoils.

Is it the truth that too much too soon is too much to handle? Leaf’s contract was $31.25 million over 4 years. He ended playing 25 games in his NFL career, which is what most pros do in just over two seasons. The music composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was identified as a child prodigy, but throughout his life had money problems and could not cope, dying penniless. (You can read more about Mozart from the Piano Teacher N15 blog.)

Success spoils – that is why Cristiano Ronaldo, fresh off his world cup exploits, sought a new move from Real Madrid to Juventus. After a few years of winning everything there is to win, staying hungry by moving to a less winning team is the only way to keep striving and improving!

Looking beyond the obvious for meaning

Remembering going on a school trip when you were younger? For you as a student, it might have been a welcome escape from the drudgery of classroom life, a chance to explore beyond the four walls.

Many of us will remember more perhaps the freedom of a school trip. Sure, you were still bound by rules of what to do, what not to do, timings you had to meet, language phrases in case you were stuck … but most of us would remember having the license to roam and explore, as the teacher really couldn’t be everywhere, supervising.

What the teacher’s role was on that day was being a meeting point rep, staying at a certain place, manning a certain phone, while students followed their inner guidance and came back if they had difficulties.

The freedom to explore one’s own instincts is a truly magical thing. It means you can go where your heart leads you, and the discoveries you make are meaningful and have relevance to you. What you learn, sticks with you. Most of us can remember events that happened on school trips, or family holidays vividly.

It is of more worth to the individual, in a history lesson, to actually see and experience a place, trying to visualise himself or herself as one living in that time and condition. For example, when we speak of the many that died in Flanders and the battlefields of northern France, they are just numbers in textbooks.

But take a trip to Flanders and see for yourself all the poppy wreaths laid down, and you will have a more meaningful idea of what war was like.

Music can have a similar experience too. According to Piano Teacher N4, music can take you on an incredible journey. When you play the piano, see it not just as a sheet of music with instructions you have to follow. Play the music, yes, but try to understand the person writing it, the composer, and what he was trying to convey. Why is there the sudden change from loud to soft in the music of Beethoven? What was Stravinsky trying to do with all the rhythmic motifs? If you seek to understand the motivation of the person behind the music, then it will hold more personal meaning for you. And like a school trip, you will be taken out of the walls of conventional thinking into a more meaningful experience.

Risk; and thinking out of the box

It is hard not to be affected by World Cup fever at the moment. Every where you look, people are fascinated by the football going on. Even non-football fans are affected. Perhaps it is because everyone is, and it is hard not to feel anti-social about it if you diss it in front of people who are genuinely affected. So everyday I hear about what has been going on, even though I may not necessarily like football very much myself – or not to the extent that others do.

One of the surprises of the tournament may be the fact that champions Germany are out already. Now, as some of my more worldly football friends may tell me, this is not a surprise, and this could have been anticipated already because the signs were there. Germany are in a transitional stage and many of those who were young and experienced in winning the last World Cup have matured and slowed down. Manuel Neuer is not the first choice goalie of his team, and it so proved in the vital game when he was dispossessed and lost the ball way outside his own half. While many question what he was doing there as an outfield player anyway, there was nothing wrong in it; ice-hockey goalies routinely venture out of their goal, and Neuer, rather than making a mistake like many assumed he was, was merely leveraging his skills to pass long balls (he has a strong leg, remember?) into the penalty area. He was using his peripheral skills as a goalie to get an advantage, a football virtuoso, not a music virtuoso looking to create more opportunities for his team. At least he didn’t make the same mistake as music composer and pianist Frederic Chopin did, which was to head for Majorca thinking it would be nice in winter, except that it rained heavily and lodging was hard to fine, leading him to seek refuge in an old abandoned monastery, exacerbating his health symptoms. The football equivalent would have been Neuer injuring himself trying a cross into the penalty area!

Germany’s decline was already in doubt, my football muse tells me. If you look at Arsenal’s Mesut Ozil, he has been struggling all season long and now that he has gained a five year contract, Arsenal manager Unai Emery should just try to extricate him from it, otherwise he will drag the team down like a lead balloon. But that is Arsenal’s problem. Mine is just waiting for the football to be over so life can return to normal, instead of the football circus!

Doh, a deer …

What is your favourite kind of music? You may like rock. You may like RnB. If you are more the classical music kind, you might prefer impassioned Romantic music, or technical Baroque music, or a bit of both, such as when piano music combines two styles. The pianist and composer Ferruccio Busoni, for example was born in the Romantic era and tended to interpret older works by Bach with the romantic passion.

Giving old things a new twist is something we see all around us. Take the world of fashion. You see a garment or a piece of clothing and try to match it or wear it in a different way.  Ten years ago office dress and trainers would have been a no-no. Now it is commonplace and I must admit, it is not only comfortable, but works better than having to wear high heels in the office. Do you see men wearing military boots?

Looking at new ways to do old things is a refreshing skill to have. If we get stuck in our office jobs and expect that everything rolls along like it does on an escalator, than pretty soon after that happens your boss will learn that the work escalator may roll on without you and you may be surplus to requirements. But by showing you have new insights into existing practices, you are not only demonstrating potential for improvement to your boss, but showing you are thinking outside the box – but not by being too radical for its own sake.

Which takes us to the title of this post – Doh, A Deer from the Sound of Music. The lyrics go “Let’s start from the very beginning, and a very good place to start …”

When we are at work, look at things that you often do and try to see if you can minimise the time spent on time, or whether they can be phased out entirely, or replaced in a better way.

When my mother worked in an office and they still had punch cards, someone figured that a more efficient way to track when employees arrived and left was for computers to record the time they were booted up and shut down using the user’s login details. This got rid of the punch cards for attendance, and the unnecessary tracking of employee attendance.

In this day and age, if we can demonstrate our worth to our employers subtly, we are positioning ourselves to remain in our jobs, or move up.  Try to add value-addedness to your job, by looking for ways to improve existing processes and refine them.

 

Being two-faced (or more)

Do you have many faces? You might need more makeup.

Seriously though, when I say we have many faces, what I mean is that we have different sides to us. The face we show at home is different to the face we show at work. The face we show at home in front of our kids is different to the face that we show when they are not around. No one person is the same in different situations.

Take for example, this fellow Tom. In the office he is mild-mannered and agreeable, but on Saturdays when he goes to the football stadium he turns into a different person, disagreeing with refereeing decisions against his team, chanting taunts at opposing players, vociferously slagging them off. Tom goes home, kisses his wife and kids hello, reads the little ones the bedtime stories, and after that he goes out with his mates where they take turns badmouthing their other halves and complaining about women.

Stella works as a PA and is pretty much her boss’s runner, meekly taking orders, but after work she goes home and decides to go out with her friends, whereupon she tears up the dance floor.

When the people in various parts of their lives come together, they are surprised that the Tom or Stella they know is different from the other ones people know.

Is it good to have many sides to you? Yes. Your work may require you to be forceful, strong and opinionated, but maybe your children don’t need to see that side of you. Your children may think of you as generally sweet and cuddly, but they should know you can be capable of being forceful if they cross the line. Some sides of us may be less appealing than others, and we may try to suppress them, but there is no advantage in maintaining only one side to ourselves. If we refuse to acknowledge the darker side of us, we may find ourselves taken advantage of by people who bully us for trying to be to nice.

According to a Finsbury Park piano teacher, the composer and pianist Mozart had many sides to him. While he is recognised for being somewhat of an outlandish extrovert, no one saw the depressed side to him, the one he reverted to in private. Did he come under pressure to maintain the happy extrovert face at all times? Perhaps when he was down in the dumps the expectation by others that he should be positive and not feel sad might have even been a bit oppressive.

We all have different sides to ourselves, and the glimpses of others we come across may not represent them as a whole. That’s just how it is.