Doh, a deer …

What is your favourite kind of music? You may like rock. You may like RnB. If you are more the classical music kind, you might prefer impassioned Romantic music, or technical Baroque music, or a bit of both, such as when piano music combines two styles. The pianist and composer Ferruccio Busoni, for example was born in the Romantic era and tended to interpret older works by Bach with the romantic passion.

Giving old things a new twist is something we see all around us. Take the world of fashion. You see a garment or a piece of clothing and try to match it or wear it in a different way.  Ten years ago office dress and trainers would have been a no-no. Now it is commonplace and I must admit, it is not only comfortable, but works better than having to wear high heels in the office. Do you see men wearing military boots?

Looking at new ways to do old things is a refreshing skill to have. If we get stuck in our office jobs and expect that everything rolls along like it does on an escalator, than pretty soon after that happens your boss will learn that the work escalator may roll on without you and you may be surplus to requirements. But by showing you have new insights into existing practices, you are not only demonstrating potential for improvement to your boss, but showing you are thinking outside the box – but not by being too radical for its own sake.

Which takes us to the title of this post – Doh, A Deer from the Sound of Music. The lyrics go “Let’s start from the very beginning, and a very good place to start …”

When we are at work, look at things that you often do and try to see if you can minimise the time spent on time, or whether they can be phased out entirely, or replaced in a better way.

When my mother worked in an office and they still had punch cards, someone figured that a more efficient way to track when employees arrived and left was for computers to record the time they were booted up and shut down using the user’s login details. This got rid of the punch cards for attendance, and the unnecessary tracking of employee attendance.

In this day and age, if we can demonstrate our worth to our employers subtly, we are positioning ourselves to remain in our jobs, or move up.  Try to add value-addedness to your job, by looking for ways to improve existing processes and refine them.